Turbulent Is Ready to Change the World!

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After 2 years of engineering and build iterations the team of Turbulent has finished its first 15kW low-head hydropower turbine. This is a scalable technology that can be installed at any kind of water fall, rapid, or water control structure in rivers and canals. By basing this turbine on the principle of a whirlpool, it is both fish friendly and can let debris pass through. Find us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TurbulentHydro/ or visit our website for more information: http://www.turbulent.be/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Amazing how we suddenly have so many views and comments! And thank you for all of the advice! I just want to clarify a few things I saw asked in the comments: - We shot this footage during commissioning. When installing a hydropower turbine you first test it for a while at half the nominal flow. That's what you see passing through this turbine. It doesn't look very stable yet, as it needs additional flow for the vortex to stabilize itself (Think about how you get that sucking sound at the last few liters running from your bath tub). Full flow of this turbine is 1.8m3/s with a height difference of 1.7m. That gives 15kW of useful electric power with our efficiency of 50%. - When we were finished shooting the video, we put back the trash rack (with a spacing between the bars of 10cm as that is the maximum debris size that can pass through) and the mesh that covers the whole basin. No children, dogs, pirates,... can fall in. -60 homes can be powered in Chile with an average household power demand of 0.25 kW. The average in many European countries is 0.5 kW. The average in American homes could well be a few MW if the comments are to go by :P -Yes, waterwheels have been done before, and turbines as well. We don't claim to have invented hydropower. We claim, however, that we have made this size of hydropower an interesting investment with a lower cost and a higher efficiency. Our hope is to offer a clean, eco-friendly alternative for investors, land owners, industries etc to generate power from the rivers that they have running in their neighborhood. As one of the co-founders, I can tell you that I enjoy nature, and that I want my kids growing up learning about and seeing technologies that try to work in harmony with it. - Some rivers meander too much for our technology. These rivers aren't suitable. We know about this, thank you for mentioning it. -We're not related to any kickstarter or crowdfund campaign. I made the video in my spare time as a hobby and I'm honestly a bit surprised that it became so popular. What I was hoping for, was to meet like minded people who want to help make our vision a reality. Affordable electrification for all without harming nature. A lot of people here have been really nice, with lots of helpful advice. Thank you for that! I believe we, as a society, can achieve anything if we just work together. - Any good scientific peer review should scrutinize the numbers. I'm busy making a new video with full flow footage and footage of our inverter power readout. Please tell me what you'd like to see in there and I'll try and arrange it :) - Last but not least: we're still in the testing phase. Currently we're checking all the systems and we're making sure this turbine can do what it promises. It seems to be holding up well against erosion and debris. We had some power cable heating, but got it solved. We will also be conducting fish friendliness tests. The whole design was based on the fish friendly design parameters of the Alden turbine Labs. We will validate those numbers. This model is now being worked on and we will be ready by July 2018 with our testing phase. When all of that is done, we will be ready to start helping people everywhere to develop their very own hydropower turbine and build their future! Thank you for your attention, stay tuned for more updates!

Comments

Output Coupler : While this is a neat idea, it looks like it won't scale at all. This would be great for getting power to remote communities not already served by a grid, but not much else I think. I would _really_ play down the comparisons to traditional hydroelectric power, because those comparisons make your device looks really, really bad. Consider a more in depth comparison against the Hoover Dam and those transmission lines you crap on so much at the start of the video. The Hoover Dam produces 2,080,000 kW. Your system produces 15 kW. So to replace a large dam like the Hoover, you need 138,666.7 of your units. Assuming you could pack them in super densely on a river, spaced every 100 yards, you'd need almost 9,000 miles of river to produce the same power, more than twice the length of the longest river on the planet. But you'll never get your units installed that densely, so you'd need WAY more than that. Not happening. So this literally cannot replace large scale hydroelectric power. What about more localized power? Let's say we want to power a small American town, population 10,000. We'll be generous and only consider residential power. Let's assume there are an average of 3 people per home, for 3,333 homes to power. The average American home uses 900 kWh of power each month. Your unit produces 10,800 kWh per month, so can power 12 houses (not the 60 you claim, that was dishonest). So to power the small town, you need 278 of your units. _Just_ for the residential power. You also get zero reserve capacity to handle surges, so you either still need those expensive transmission lines to provide power from elsewhere when needed, or overprovision your hydroelectric system, or build energy storage. This is getting really expensive, really fast, and is going to be well outside the budget of what a town of this size could do. Assuming the tax burden is spread evenly, each household would be responsible for 8.3% of the cost of one of your units. You don't mention how much it cost to build these, but my guess is that's not going to be pocket change. Don't interpret this as me saying your technology is bad. I think it's a nice idea, but you're barking up the wrong tree comparing yourself to hydroelectric dams. Play up the way this can power remote communities with limited access to power, that's where this technology will shine. If you come out swinging with "we're so much better than traditional hydro power", then prepare for the internet debunking brigade to rip your claims to shreds.

Lyle Stavast : works at night. works when wind isn't blowing. no battery. efficiency is very secondary. installation requirements are simple. regulation of voltage/amperage output important dynamically. you could distill water as a power sink if need be.... Cool stuff - wish you well in your projects :)

Gold Hunter : Small decentralized power is a great idea. I bet the Globalists hate your for it.

Red Mountain : Guess I'll have to start saving up for a creek.

angurisloud : Let's see some DATA... you're generating electricity... anyone got a meter? Let's see numbers!

Waruna Sanjeewa : please came to sri lanka and, start your that project...

Building Your Own Private Beach : Much reason to continued the optimization of this. All the best...

Wibin : Engineer here. This will be somewhat inefficient as plenty of energy goes into the wall as friction. However, I'd imagine that this is more fish friendly (although don't know by how much) and that the equipment should be cheaper to build and maintain than a more traditional hydro electric setup. The biggest obstacle, as far I can see, is to keep the concrete from corroding within the first year.

Noe Naame : So who pays for these? I doubt households that use on average a meager 250watts will do the huge upfront cost of the turbine and the electrical equipment... But that's just me I guess, dreamkiller

Turbulent Hydro : Amazing how we suddenly have so many views and comments! And thank you for all of the advice! I just want to clarify a few things I saw asked in the comments: - We shot this footage during commissioning. When installing a hydropower turbine you first test it for a while at half the nominal flow. That's what you see passing through this turbine. It doesn't look very stable yet, as it needs additional flow for the vortex to stabilize itself (Think about how you get that sucking sound at the last few liters running from your bath tub). Full flow of this turbine is 1.8m3/s with a height difference of 1.7m. That gives 15kW of useful electric power with our efficiency of 50%. - When we were finished shooting the video, we put back the trash rack (with a spacing between the bars of 10cm as that is the maximum debris size that can pass through) and the mesh that covers the whole basin. No children, dogs, pirates,... can fall in. -60 homes can be powered in Chile with an average household power demand of 0.25 kW. The average in many European countries is 0.5 kW. The average in American homes could well be a few MW if the comments are to go by :P -Yes, waterwheels have been done before, and turbines as well. We don't claim to have invented hydropower. We claim, however, that we have made this size of hydropower an interesting investment with a lower cost and a higher efficiency. Our hope is to offer a clean, eco-friendly alternative for investors, land owners, industries etc to generate power from the rivers that they have running in their neighborhood. As one of the co-founders, I can tell you that I enjoy nature, and that I want my kids growing up learning about and seeing technologies that try to work in harmony with it. - Some rivers meander too much for our technology. These rivers aren't suitable. We know about this, thank you for mentioning it. -We're not related to any kickstarter or crowdfund campaign. I made the video in my spare time as a hobby and I'm honestly a bit surprised that it became so popular. What I was hoping for, was to meet like minded people who want to help make our vision a reality. Affordable electrification for all without harming nature. A lot of people here have been really nice, with lots of helpful advice. Thank you for that! I believe we, as a society, can achieve anything if we just work together. - Any good scientific peer review should scrutinize the numbers. I'm busy making a new video with full flow footage and footage of our inverter power readout. Please tell me what you'd like to see in there and I'll try and arrange it :) - Last but not least: we're still in the testing phase. Currently we're checking all the systems and we're making sure this turbine can do what it promises. It seems to be holding up well against erosion and debris. We had some power cable heating, but got it solved. We will also be conducting fish friendliness tests. The whole design was based on the fish friendly design parameters of the Alden turbine Labs. We will validate those numbers. This model is now being worked on and we will be ready by July 2018 with our testing phase. When all of that is done, we will be ready to start helping people everywhere to develop their very own hydropower turbine and build their future! Thank you for your attention, stay tuned for more updates!

Armistice023 : Cool concept. Needs some safety grating/ covers though. It needs a grate for the inlet, and a full cover for the top

Jin : Claims to generate 15kw. I would be surprised if it exceeded 1

Master Robotnik : =ONLY ON MOUNTAIN RIVERS =..............

aguinaldo : Imagine if the higher ground have a really big dam and connected to the lower ground. All the electricity safes in the battery and integrated with AI which stabilize the water rates. Future would be crazy about clean energy, need a crazy ideas to develop a better living. Nice share, thank you!

Jacob Smith : Great, now please put a cover on it.

Don Lewis : Looks good, I'm a water treatment engineer so used to seeing centrifugal pumps, same principle in reverse and much much bigger ha, awsome. Interesting to see how you will reduce errosion of impellor, a constant pain of mine... Good luck!

Ron Bennett : And... you'll run into the same problem that plagued water powered industry in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th century. Rising and falling water levels, clogging problems, EPA problems. If too many people decide to use this, there'll be too much demand for water, so the flow rates for each stream or River will be altered.

J.D. Saldivar : Ola!! What a cool ass job installing these riggs!! JD/82ND

ateng lenon : I see fibonnaci pattern to create that converted energy in efficient and smart way by water flow.. beautiful.. And yes, that decentralized energy is more effective in terms of maintenance scope and monthly billing.. I prefer this than classic power plant that go on turbine -> mv to hv for transmission and go step down to mv again and go to lv for end user. Too much for initial cost, technical system monitoring and maintenance which impact electricity tariff.. The main problem is water resource.. but mm, you know, river or any natural water resources are not mandatory.. ;)

T C : Do fish get dizzy?

alexandre labelle : 15KW by hour ? by DAY ? by YEARS ?

yack Smoorai : 100$ bet that u got this idea while flushing ur toilet 😂 Not that it's a bad one

juan ramirez zavala : como puedo hacer contacto con ustedes, quisiéramos adquirir plantas desde 3 hasta 30 kW, para Mexíco. y si es posible visitar algunas en operaciión

Imake Do : Seems like profitable endeavor if you can get investors to bite but overall unpractical. I namely don't like how it encourages human intervention with natural waterways. "Fish Friendly" it is not, by a long stretch. Better to invest in lower impact tech like solar.

and44bor : // in Chile with an average household power demand of 0.25 kW. // The average in many European countries is 0.5 kW. Are you serious? Did you do the simple math properly?

Andrew Polkowski : Good Luck. Great concept tremendous room for growth.

smallfaucet : Power companies will buy them and they'll never see the light of day.

writerconsidered : The biggest problem with these technologies we have is our mindset. This a decentralized power system. People want a centralized silver bullet system, that isn't going to work. we have not had a new energy source developed since nuclear power. So if we can't easily develop a new clean energy with our modern new technology and current knowledge base than we must accept a different energy paradigm of decentralize small scale solutions.

Random User : Fish waterpark

Steve M : I had this idea over a decade ago. I'm just not smart enough to make it a reality. This could revolutionize small tribal communities who don't have access to electricity.

Vicent Zabedra : Hola quisiera más información soy de bolivia y como puedo adquirir uno de esos generadores d energía eléctrica gracias

dieselrotor : Needs safety revisions but what a great piece of work. Kudos.

iCraftDay : Where can I buy one xd Edit: nvm.

C : Awaiting thunderf00t...

femanvate : Turbulent is not going to save the world, but they are making an effort, a step forward. After seeing so many negative comments here, I'd bet good money that these people would complain on their first day in heaven (or whatever you believe is equivalent)

Albert Adams : I've read about similiar concept in some polish book from '20 (S. Żeromski "Przedwiośnie", english title: "The spring to come"), I don't think that this will ever happen.

Luke Pratt : This thing makes about $14300 per year using USA electricity prices. Not including maintenance. And that's assuming they didn't use an ideal and unusual case for their demonstration numbers. But it looks very expensive to build...? Step one of changing the world with green energy: cost-effective.

Greg Waters : With the ability to store some power and level peak demand maybe more homes can be powered. I love low-head hydro systems. Ultimately by diversification of power sources, some storage capability, and the lowered demands of microcircuitry, we will enjoy greater security. When I was an engineering student at CSU Chico, the Chinese had located a large cavern in the rock. They bulkheaded it off and pumped the watervto the top using cheap power out of the existing grid and released it during peak time. They profited from the cost differential and were able to level the energy usage.

W.W. : let's see the R&D numbers. It seems rad, but so do fairy tales

valveman12 : A good idea! The only issue is ICE build up in the Winter or can this be installed where it can get well below zero?

Dr Fox : i would sign the petition to approve this this is amazing! you guys are making the world so much safer

kayakmanonthego : Why SHOUT WITH ALL-UPPER-CASE SUBTITLES? The subtitles could have been so much easier to follow for so much bigger an audience world-wide --- and so much more effective ---- if done in regular sentence case.

D Vice : nice! its like a more efficient sideways waterwheel I just watched the video about how screwed we are when we start running out of oil ppl better get on this kind of stuff

Selected Solutions : I also have mine @ 60w using conical basin and with lesser alloy blades compared to yours, get updated updated of upscaled version next month

uruiamnot : Great idea until someone falls, swims, or jumps into it. Oh, and is this crocodile proof? How about deer? And what about beavers? Maybe a few power transmission lines would help. And dontcha think it needs a fence around it?

Fajar Nugraha Saefullah : well i think its amazing inovation because it needs less space. But at the same height, will it produce more power than general micro hydro power plant?

cannotfindavoice : This is fantastic & about time that this kind of thing is being done, it is such a simple concept that can help many people. Keep up your great work you are a fantastic example to all who see this & or use this.

SJVChE : How abrasion resistant are the turbine surfaces, what about flood conditions with high sediment load?

SovanDai : Don't think just beat your meat 🔥