Falcon 9 landing anomaly explained
Falcon 9 first stage landing anomaly explained

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Following stage separation, Falcon 9’s first stage suffered a landing anomaly, failing to land on Landing Zone 1 (LZ-1) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Instead, the Falcon 9 first stage made a water landing in the Atlantic Ocean. Hans Koenigsmann. SpaceX Vice President of Mission Assurance, explains the anomaly. The Falcon 9 rocket launched the CRS-16 Dragon spacecraft from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on 5 December 2018, at 18:16 UTC (13:16 EST). Credit: NASA/SpaceX #CRS16

Comments

David Sosnak : Even when not sucess its sucess.

Julia Crawford : This really is incredible to watch. If it had landed on land, it may have been a perfect landing even with the anomaly.

Diggnuts : Failure is important. It reality-tests the emergency systems and makes for better systems... This display was impressive.

David Griffeth : A perfect emergency landing. This just proved the other systems worked properly during failure of others. I expected to see a rocket slam into the water but this was nearly a soft touchdown. They will learn from this failure immensely.

K. Péter : Didn't know Sean Bean worked for spaceX

Husein Nashr : Falcon 9 booster's computer went sully

Claudette S : SpaceX has the most incredible engineers and scientists and I'm in awe! Even their oopses are awesome.

awuma : Space X have to sacrifice a Block 5 next year for the in-flight abort test with Dragon 2. Perhaps Elon had that in mind when he Tweeted that it could be re-used for an internal mission.

Jeph Leyba : an opportunity to learn from a failed Landing. besides the landing everything look great. good job Mr Musk and those at space X

Maico : block 5 just tweeted : I felt a little SEAsick :D

Wogsy Kirk : Its only a failure if you don't learn anything from it. And they must have have some incredible data from this. Data which will help make future endeavours safer and more reliable. SpaceX is doing amazing things. Im rooting for them so much.

Luís Garcia Filipe : Very happy with space x, even on hard failure, they are still in control. Water as just a safety measure. The booster would landed perfectly in safe parameters. Huge victory and hard work proven 110% battle tank :)

coke : 0:38 COME ON TARS!

Rick Papineau : Meanwhile, there's a flat-Earther somewhere saying that the malfunction was caused by crashing into "the dome"...

Jasmine Rubalcava : I was watching it live, and I was wondering why it was rotating out of bounds 🤔 Either way, this was a great launch nonetheless!! 👍

ICh Du : That german accent

Rowan Foxley : Thanks Boromir!

Aleksander Todorov : Good job SpaceX. I bet that your teams will analyse the hell out of this rocket and this will benefit all future launches and landings! Keep up the good work!

SwissSpace : You deserve way more subs!

Алексей Савенков : Windows 10 October 2018 Update (v.1809) ????

tilenn : I didn't know that Sean Bean was also an engineer.

Warribo : You know, I think SpaceX is actually going to make it to Mars :)

JoeDotPHP : He didn't really explain anything that the video didn't show us. EDIT: Saw Elon's Tweet. "Grid fin hydraulic pump stalled, so Falcon landed just out to sea. Appears to be undamaged & is transmitting data. Recovery ship dispatched." -Elon Musk

Adam Mroz : Well done Elon Musk!

Kenneth Ord : It didn't "land", it "watered".

Bryan Kennedy : I knew it that look totally unstable and then they cut the feed

pterodox123 : Ok 10 times on the replay is enough!

Sad Toast : The live stream cut away it was disappointing they should have played it and just reacact naturally

Алексей Ребров : He looks like Snawn Bean on minimal)

Mark Kazmier : They probably could reuse the Grid fins as they are solid titanium and the problem is simply a pump pressure issue.

what's up : Fin issues. In a sense this is good... they will learn from this and improve.

ForcedFed4 Garage : It's incredible that the main engines were able to gimbal enough and fast enough to keep the booster upright.

Plads Elsker : yooo that falcon 9 rocket just went full mlg yolo 19 roll-flip-recovery beast mode and, well, landed without a desastrous crash. Hell of a good job. I wonder if they are going to try to reuse it or not, even if it went into the sea?

playgroundchooser : Block 5s are so damn durable they can now "crash" and still go about their business. I can't believe it safed itself still!

D Hansel : I understand one of the hydraulic pumps failed. They are going to install a backup for future flights. We learn from our mistakes.

James Esteron : "Koenigsmann" is German and translates to Kingsman. That's one cool name.

Ryul Park : Misunderstood sean bean. As Martian's actor

Thaief Ahmed : I think it is still reusable.😀

Cosmo Silver : Still was a safe landing and most of the parts can be re-used again.

It'sVille : Flight computer switched on sully mode XD

Dick Holman : A perfect landing abort procedure, & the control systems ability to react correctly is very impressive.

Common Sense : Thank you for this video. As far as a landing failure. Yes it didn’t land on the platform but its surprised me with slowly settling in the water.

PointyTailofSatan : If they reuse that booster, name it Captain Nemo. lol

The Capacitor : Yeah Mr White. Yeah Science! :D

Jake Heke : Space x should contact Moog Aircraft inc. They make the redundant Electrohydrostatic servos for the F-35.

Joe Shmoe : I was wondering when it started to roll, and they cut the camera coverage.

Loopy Mind : Good to see that even when experiencing a failure, the rocket is still able to get itself over water and land relatively soft.

Moonstruck Exploring : Its nice to know the 1st stage is smart all the way down. A redundant pump would be the answer. Fun to watch! SpaceX is amazing!

Ginny855 : Hans Koenigsmann is such a cool guy! I had the opportinity to listen to his presentation at the IAC 2018. He's very good in explaining rocket science 😁