Skywalker Hand

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Sasfoot : This is so cool.

Tiago G. : Deus EX, a few amputees away.

Brandon Davis : oh i can hear the people saying how great god is >o

alienorbiter : He plays better than me :) Now, a faster trick would be converting muscle movement into midi data.

Austin McDaniel : smoked so many dabs with this guy

Shashank Srivastav : This is superb!

rocklobster1976 : Well done!!! Soooooooo All we need are some piezo ultrasound mics.. A very... Ergonomic and moderately articulate 3d model.... Sturdy straps and foundation...... Pneumatics? And a pair of intel arduino 101s running their neural nets? Or just tensor flow? .... Why Pneumatics? Isnt that to squishy and delayed? Oh i guess it can build enough pressure to maintain a resistance. Just so slow. If it was - my- career that was hanging in the balance........ I would toss the pneumatics for a thin flat nitianol weave... With the reinforcement of a piezo bender pair... Would be an intimately connected (Piezo nit piezo) then keep packing and layering these within each phalanx. The nitanol filling empty spaces where needed I think that sounds slightly expensive to manufacture though... But its begging to resemble a layered muscle structure.... Minus standard bones. Piezo slipage? Hey but that's just me. You all really did a great job

Jperetz1 : im an amputee, and this is such a waste. use this technology for something useful instead of just playing the piano. all you gotta do is make a prosthetic that's not flimsy as fuck and make it for everyday use... just saying.

J Meeseeks : How well does it grip objects?

Shalom Ormsby : Very exciting work! When amputees are able to play a musical instruments with hands like this, they'll be able to do just about anything. I can't wait for that day (so I want to help make it happen)! How much computing power does this sensing mechanism require, and how well can the hardware be miniaturized? Looking forward to when this sensing tech is used to power the next generation of highly-dexterous bionic hands.