Chair Mystery

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TheAdventuresOf : The chair fell through the Ice after the just top had frozen. Then refroze.

KANEDA : Its actually an imprint of the bubbles rising from the chair, the kind you see on your legs when you take a bath, as they were rising while the water was freezing they made a sort of "shadow picture". there you go.

Spartan-Samuel Caster : Why did I get a notification for this?

VeeScore.com : Hey, it is a bit like photography. The pool bottom reflects the sun different where the chair is. This difference in absorbing vs. reflecting the sunlight that comes through the ice is enough to render the structure of the ice different than the surrounding. In a lake you dont see this because everything is 'dark'.

ted belcher : video not shot gud

soupsnake : Aliens

Andrew Jay : "Before" it froze is the big thing. you would need someone with thermal dynamics and water physics (that is if it was in the pool before it froze) my guess is that air bubbles that would have been on the chair itself at the bottom would have been pushed off as ice formed on the chair early (because metal is a great heat absorb) and as ice was forming on top at the same time. these bubbles would have pushed or left a mark as they made their way out or to be trapped right under the ice.

Gabriel Perez : God

Puss In Boots : CGI

Robby Stokoe : Water has air dissolved in it. The chair's surface provides nucleation sites which allow the air to come out of solution and form a bubble. This is what happens before water begins to boil when bubbles form on the surface of the pot---scratches in the pot make it easier for air to form bubbles. The water in the pool is very still, so the bubbles rise straight up and get caught in the ice as it freezes, making it cloudy and white in the shape of the chair.

Cpt.Falco : All inanimate objects have souls. When the chair rested at the bottom and stopped living, it's soul ascended and was trapped by the surface layer of ice.